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election on either side. >> i will turner to the audience starting with dan glickman but california we have had a big shake up there in a new redistricting -- what are you watching in california? >> air seats that are in levels of contention. summer non-republican and democrat on democrat spending huge sums of money. as republican campaign chairman, california is always the toughest state force in a presidential race and eyes in eyes has been going into the presidency year, the turnout could hurt us. once you get and lend inland a little bit, california a little bit different at this point but that is something. it comes late and we want to make sure in we don't get her clock cleaned. i always get nervous about california. >> i advise pointed out to my friends at my home state of texas does not believe in referendum, recall or that good government stuff and i think we don't have term limits. i think that the fact that we have this crazy long california which was the result of the referendum i think is unfortunate and not good for the political process. >> the primary or the redistricting co
.c. for a while, moved to california. i was married for a while in california and then i moved to washington and i wasn't married again, and now i'm about to get married again. [laughter] so, thank you. hopefully it's the same guy. don't forget that. [laughter] >> you don't get gifts every time he there. that's problem. so i did have this very, i certainly had a personal stake in that so i was very pleasantly surprised him outside and i do think also, i want to look at this deeper but it feels to me like this time the disconnect between the power of voting and the actual voting wasn't as big as it was in the past which just the extent that people were saying different things, if that ever was true, it feels like in this race are polling suggested that was kind of the margin and we won by the margins that were fairly close to the polling and i think if that's true that's very good news for us as we go forward with this kind of thinking. i think there was a tendency to feel that we had to really get very high numbers and so that was good news. >> that was let -- i was less confident about the racin
cummings for bringing this issue along with you. amtrak is extremely important to california. we have three of the top five busiest corridors in our california area. two of them are supported totally by the state. i see that there are some cuts coming through and i'm going to be looking at that very closely because it has a 2.8 million ridership. our state support services program as has been stated, vitality must be supported for the state-supported services program. incentivizing the states to work with passenger rail service to complement the national network. is important to all states, especially california, we are a donor states because gives more options to commuters and many intercity travelers while reducing pollution. california's been at the forefront of reduction of pollution and cars and several other areas and we continue to look for ways to be able to get people out of cars and into public transportation. the transportation commission are voicing their opinions -- talk to the transportation secretary brian kelly and rail to finish billbrad beyond keon how they view amtrak's w
their campuses safer. states from california to florida have introduced legislation to make it clear that child abuse reporting is not only a moral duty, but it's the law. this is tremendous progress. laws strengthens, policies tightened, governance revisited, and institutions made safer, and our work continues. that brings us to today, on the brink of the one year anniversary, civil lawsuits, perjury trials, and we can expect more fallout to come. over the last year, we have learned much about ourselves, our many cultures, our values, and our vision. we're still working through some difficult issues, but the question remains where do we go from here? the answer can be found by returning to penn state's core mission -- teaching, research, and service. our bottom line is delivering an outstanding education to students. our students are our top priority. i repeat, our students are our top priority, and they are doing great things. for example, this year, our journalism students captured the national championship in the william randolff hurst journalism award. engineering students took top honors
's the question. to my good friend from california, i don't want anyone to believe that under the law of war construct that we have created over the last seven or eight years, that you can be put in jail because you look like a muslim, that you sound like a muslim, that you have got a name muhammad. what happened to japanese american citizens, they were put in military custody because we were all afraid and they looked like the enemy. that was not a high point in america. what are we talking about here? we're talking about detaining people under the law of war who are suspected of joining al qaeda of the taliban in engaging in a belligerent act against the united states. now, i want to make the record clear that some of my colleagues on the republican side have been trying to deny law of war detention to the obama administration, and they have openly said this. if you allow this to happen, president obama is going to put you in jail because of political dissent. there are people on my side who are afraid of law of war detention being in barack obama's hand because they think -- they hate him
-- [laughter] california -- anybody from california? illinois, connecticut -- thank goodness. [laughter] what those states are doing is raising taxes, raising regulation, and so that's -- that's our, you know, we're competing and so what we do every day is find companies out there who can't compete. i think about it as this. if you're in business or think about yourself as a consumer. as a consumer, name a time you said to yourself, you know, i'll pay more for that product because they are headquartered in the high tax state. [laughter] oh, gosh, they have more regulations, i'll pay more for that because it costs the company more because they have regulations or it takes longer to get a permit. you don't do it. if we make sure that florida businesses have lower taxes, less regulations, faster permitting time, a pro-business attitude, our businesses will out compete everybody. we'll get more competitive every day. our biggest competitor is texas. texas is doing the right thing. look at the last of the eight years, texas is the number one place to do business. when i first got legislated, i --
states like the university of california with what has been the premier example of planning the master plan for the last 50 years. we have the state university of new york which kind of pulls together a lot of different philosophy, then you have michigan, and michigan since the frontier days has selected as its design principal anarchy and what that means is that each of the 15 campuses, public campuses in the state have constitutional autonomy. we have no umbrella organization that philosophy has allowed the state over the last century and a half to develop one of the finest higher education systems and the country with one of the lowest levels of support. actually the state of michigan didn't provide any support at all for higher education until the late 19th century. it spent all of the money that it retained from selling land and kept it and didn't give it to the university. the university of michigan has learned from that and consciously over the last several decades has redesigned itself to be loosely coupled adopted system will and what i mean by that is through a variety of ste
was at active in the civil rights movement in the 60s and in the 70s he was in northwest california where he and his wife raised their two sons neck and neil. he taught at a conference of one high school among the redwoods. and he began writing about contemporary issues. he is a prolific writer. his latest book is "mr. president: how and why the founders created a chief executive." it is my pleasure to welcome back to the david library, ray raphael. [applause] >> it is a pleasure to be at the david library with a full and eager crowd. this history is important. we will be talking not about ancient history by contemporary history. the history of the founding and let me start by noting that americans engage every four years into very unique principles. one in october and we are about to start six days from now. about half the nation firmly determined that their side loses nomination goes to ruins. they figure out which of the two contestants they prefer. that is one of our rituals. it is highly partisan. the other ritual that we will also talk about his every four years in october, americans u
coastal town in california. he was the subject, on the fbi most wanted list and responsible for 20 murders in boston. no american official knew where he was. it's hard to prove negatives but we have 6000 documents from the bin laden compound that have been translated. if there's there is a smoking gun, proving official pakistani passivity operations are not so good that we would not pointed out publicly at this point. >> the difference between diplomats and journalists is that journalists say more than they know and diplomats no morew more than they say. but we are in harmony on this one. [laughter] there is no evidence i have seen that there was high-level complicity or knowledge about him being in abbottabad. this led to the problem that if you don't know you can be a accused of and confidence in this was a domestic issue but that is a different question than we are talking about. there is to my knowledge no evidence that they knew that he was there during that time. >> one quick follow up, al qaeda tried to kill general musharraf. al qaeda was at war with the pakistani state and the pak
the commonwealth club of california in san francisco, this is 45 minutes. >> good evening and welcome to the meeting of the common wealth club of california. i am chair the clubs grown ups for amend your host for today. we also welcome our listening audience and we invite everyone to listen to us on line at commonwealth club.org. now it's my pleasure to introduce our distinguished speaker. marc freedman is ceo and founder of encore.org, a nonprofit organization working to promote encore careers. second acts for the greater good. he spearheaded the creation of the experience core, now one of america's largest nonprofit national service programs engaging people over 55. and the purpose prize, which annually provides five, 100,000-dollar prices to social innovators in the second half of life. freedman was described by "the new york times" as the voice of aging baby boomers who will are beginning retirement for meaningful and sustainable work later in life. while the work "wall street journal" stated, in the past decade, mr. freedman has emerged as a leading voice in discussions nationwid
south and west as california. those screws that can get in relatively fast have driven in. we still have equipment in teams on the west coast that the concern was still three to five days transit time to get them to the east coast. there's also concern that if they couldn't get back to their fire season when think it's going they would send the resources. so the president directed that we bring to bear dat resources aircraft. so there are teams and equipment that will be airlifted from california, west coast teams to support this response, but also understand that teams for our do nothing well before sandi hit. additional teams called from the midwest and the south, where it makes sense they can drive and faster. whether it makes sense to fly teams in come of the crew starts flying this afternoon. >> thank you, mr. chairman. >> next question from an adrenaline. >> hi, i'm wondering how the contracting process is going. i know some contracts are rhodium placed. this request for proposals for other types of aid. and also, this fema have enough money with a 3.6 billion, especially when the
from california, for five minutes to thank you, very much, mr. chairman. i want to thank you for holding this hearing and working with the democrats to make this a bipartisan hearing. we are talking about this ongoing health tragedy. an untold number of vials of steroids were contaminated. they have sold all -- they have so far killed 32 people. it has brought unspeakable devastation to so many families. that is why i am grateful for it joyce lovelace to be here. it takes a great deal of courage to come forward. let's not lose sight of the wrongdoer. the regulators deserve blame. the primary blame is the company. we have theubpoena, the former president necc, barry cadden, we asked him to testify about how this company handled the matter. what we learned is that even 10 years ago, people who were regulating the company indicated that they had sloppy practices. in many years ago they indicated that they could have can have a meningitis outbreak. it wasn't corrected by the company. and the company went about its ways, telling people that they were going to behave better. they
into the economy in hard-hit states like nevada, florida, ohio, colorado, pennsylvania and california than any institution. they may be more important than the fed. again, we have to look at money in politics. as i say what was then and in effect of a change of opinion. >> this is very interesting. comments from offers speakers that i want to ask at a demographic group none of you touched on this site because distant name i heard of demography being impactful in america. one out of every five americans has a disability and 51% of likely voters said they have a family member with a disability. yet, at the national press club when there was an opportunity or, as you know, the past president of the press club for the romney campaign and the obama can antisense him to some to speak about disability issues, the romney campaign showed not to attend or issue a position paper on disabilities. so i wanted to ask, why given that one out of every five americans has the disability, 51% of american voters has a family or with a disability. why isn't there more of a conversation about that demographic withi
in a highly competitive and highly mobile labor pool, alabama and california and texas and vermont have some sense that their kids have a common basis of knowledge. so since they came up with the national governors association, i would hope that we could have more discussion. >> i agree. michael gold is really doing a lot of work in the united kingdom. he got all excited. in the k-12 system, it goes to the heart of it. there is this deep belief that we need to develop acute self-esteem so we can perform. we need to do is tell people we need to do that to have self-esteem. because we get that right, that will be great. they are not easy to achieve, but if i could wave a wand i would make k-12 teachers america's heroes. they would be the profession that we all aspire to, they would be places like japan where they call their teachers sensei and you can feel the difference between we view those in america and those in other countries. we have decided to unionize rather than professionalize. when you do that, but you end up with is creating this in k-12. a lot of people disagree. i think that cho
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14

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